How To Plant for Pollinators

We’ve all heard that bees are declining at rapid rates, and that many environmental stressors (including neonicotinoid pesticides) are the culprit. Neonics play a particularly integral role in the collapse of bees because they make the bees more susceptible to these environmental stressors that they are often otherwise immune to.

Some of these environmental stressors or conditions are things we might not think of: lawns and lack of flowers to pollinate, for example. So, how can you personally help the bees? Head down to your local (we love supporting local business at Basmati), organic nursery and plant some flowers in your yard. 

But, what types of flowers and plants should you plant in your home garden or yard? Below is a list of plants that benefit pollinators!

First, a few things to consider (more on this here):

  • It is best to plant flowers and other plants that are native to your region as care may be easier and the bees are already regionally adapted to these plants.
  • Try to stick with single flower tops as they contain more nectar and easier accessibility than their double headed counterparts.
  • It’s helpful to plant a few different types of flowers and other plants to have more than one bloom season per year – providing honeybees and other pollinators with food for more of the year.
  • Take it easy on the fall cleanup: pollinators and many other creatures use leaves as habitats year round. Also, avoid the leaf blowers if you can!
  • Create a bee bath to provide clean water to your little gardeners. But make sure that the container is filled with marbles, pebbles, and/or twigs so the bees can land while drinking and don’t risk drowning. Bees will quickly learn this is a great place to return and get fresh water!

Here’s a list of plants you can grow in your backyard or garden to support pollinators:

                                                                                                                          

PLANT
FOR
POLLINATORS

Anemone

Alstroemeria

Aubretia

Aster

Bee Balm

Blanket Flower

Bluebell

Borage

Buttercup

Butterfly Bush

Calendula

Catmint

Clover

Cilantro

Cleome

Coneflower

Crocus

Fennel

Forget-me-not

Daylily

Daisy

Hollyhock

Lavender

Lantana

Lilac

Lion’s Tail

Milkweed

Mint

Oregano

Pansy

Primrose

Penstemon

Pincushion Flower

Red Hot poker

Salvia

Sage

Sunflower

Sweet Alyssum

Thyme

Yarrow

Zinnia

 

As with any plants and flowers, make sure the seeds & plants you purchase are not treated with neonicotinoid pesticides. It is equally important to not use neonicotinoids in your pest management plans. If you have landscapers, talk to them about the importance of avoiding application of neonics. Lastly, get on your area’s ‘NO SPRAY’ list to avoid pesticides applied by the city or county in which you live.

This article originally appeared on www.simplybee.org

 

 

Articles published by Basmati.com are no substitute for medical advice. Please consult your health care provider before beginning any new regimen. For more information, please visit our disclaimer page here.

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