How to Make 5 Different Homemade Nut Milks

Almond Milk

I know very few people who dislike almond milk. This is definitely one of the most common nut milks, but that doesn't mean it isn't fantastic! It's loaded with flavor and makes a fantastic milk substitute. This is my go-to milk, and I'm sure it will be yours too. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cup raw almonds 
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon Celtic or Himalayan sea salt  
  • 3 cups filtered water or natural spring water, plus a bowl full for soaking 
  • 1 teaspoon alcohol-free, organic vanilla extract (optional) 
  • medjool dates, pitted (optional) 

Directions: 

  1. Soak the almonds in a large bowl of fresh water with 1 teaspoon of salt for at least 12 hours. 
  1. Drain the nuts and rinse really well. Put the soaked almonds, 3 cups water, and ¼ teaspoon of salt into your blender. Blend for about a minute until all the nuts are broken down and you're left with milk. Taste, and if you'd like a little more sweetness and flavor, add the vanilla and dates before blending again. Once a smooth consistency is achieved, stop blending. 
  1. Pour your almond milk into a glass bottle with a lid, and store it in the fridge. 

Cashew Milk

Technically, cashews are seeds. They're often labeled as nuts though, and for that reason, they still make a great "nut milk." This is definitely the milk for you if you like your milk to taste rich and creamy. It's very decadent and delicious and makes a great smoothie base. It's also fantastic when paired with cereal or muesli (my favorite).  

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cup raw cashews  
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon Celtic or Himalayan sea salt  
  • 3 cups filtered water or natural spring water, plus a bowl full for soaking 

Directions: 

  1. Soak the cashews in a large bowl of fresh water with 1 teaspoon of salt for 5 hours. Cashews are a soft seed, so they don't require as much soaking as, say, almonds.  
  1. Drain them and rinse really well. Put the soaked cashews, 3 cups water, and ¼ teaspoon of salt into your blender. Blend for about a minute until all the cashews are broken down and you're left with milk.  
  1. Pour your cashew milk into a glass bottle with a lid, and store it in the fridge. 

Hazelnut Milk

This milk has a slightly buttery, almost dessert-like taste to it. Can I just take a moment to say it pairs amazingly well with cocoa (think Nutella)? Hazelnuts do have a higher fat intake than most other nuts, so I wouldn't recommend making this your main milk. That said, it does make a delightful edition to a cup of hot cocoa (try this recipe – just replace the almond/coconut milk with homemade hazelnut milk!).  

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cup raw hazelnuts 
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon Celtic or Himalayan sea salt  
  • 2 cups filtered water or natural spring water, plus a bowl full for soaking 
  • 1 teaspoon alcohol-free, organic vanilla extract 
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup  

Directions: 

  1. Soak the hazelnuts in a large bowl of fresh water with 1 teaspoon of salt for 12 hours. 
  1. Drain the nuts and rinse really well. Put the soaked hazelnuts, 2 cups water, and ¼ teaspoon of salt into your blender. This milk tastes the best with a hint of sweetness, so add the maple syrup and vanilla extract now.  
  1. If your blender has variable speeds, start off slow for 10 seconds before increasing to high. Blend for about a minute until all the nuts are broken down and you're left with milk. 
  1. Pour your hazelnut milk into a glass bottle with a lid, and store it in the fridge. 

Sunflower Milk

Sunflowers are so cheerful and happy. That's why whenever you drink sunflower milk, it feels like you're ingesting that happiness. This milk is rich in zinc for healthy hair, skin, and nails. This mineral also balances your immune system, heals your nervous system, and can promote relaxation. Definitely worth making!  

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cup raw sunflower seeds (hulled) 
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon Celtic or Himalayan sea salt  
  • 3 cups filtered water or natural spring water, plus a bowl full for soaking 
  • 1 teaspoon alcohol-free, organic vanilla extract (optional) 
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (optional) 

Directions: 

  1. Soak the sunflower seeds in a large bowl of fresh water with 1 teaspoon of salt for at least 12 hours.  
  1. Drain the seeds and rinse really well. Put the soaked sunflower seeds, 3 cups water, and ¼ teaspoon of salt into your blender.  
  1. If your blender has variable speeds, start off slow for 10 seconds before increasing to high. Blend for about a minute until all the seeds are broken down and you're left with milk.
  1. Taste, and if you'd like a little more sweetness and flavor, add the vanilla and maple syrup before blending again. Once a smooth consistency is achieved, stop blending. 
  1. Pour your sunflower seed milk into a glass bottle with a lid, and store it in the fridge. 

Macadamia Milk

Macadamias are so delicious and make a rich, creamy milk (similar to cashew milk). They're an amazing source of protein, manganese, and B vitamins. They also contain healthy oils that nourish the cardiovascular system and the heart. Definitely drink this milk if you have a weak heart or just like the creamy taste of macadamias.  

Ingredients: 

  • 1 cup raw macadamia nuts 
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon Celtic or Himalayan sea salt  
  • 3 cups filtered water or natural spring water, plus a bowl full for soaking 
  • 1 teaspoon alcohol-free, organic vanilla extract (optional) 
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (optional) 

Directions: 

  1. Soak the macadamia nuts in a large bowl of fresh water with 1 teaspoon of salt for 5 hours. Macadamia nuts don't require a long soaking time.  
  1. Drain the nuts and rinse really well. Put the soaked macadamias, 3 cups water, and ¼ teaspoon of salt into your blender. Blend for about a minute until all the nuts are broken down and you're left with milk. Taste, and if you'd like a little more sweetness and flavor, add the vanilla and maple syrup before blending again. Once a smooth consistency is achieved, stop blending. 
  1. Pour your macadamia milk into a glass bottle with a lid, and store it in the fridge. 

Note: All the homemade milks listed above should keep for about two days if left in the fridge, so make sure you use them up quick!

 

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